CSL Workshops

CSL holds workshops to support and encourage instructors in service learning and other community engagement efforts. Past workshops have addressed best practices in service learning, critical reflection, and community partnerships.


View Previous Workshops

New workshop for Graduate Teaching Assistants

Introduction to Service Learning
a high impact practice


 

12:00 pm  - 1:30 pm   |    Wednesday, October 19, 2016   |    Centennial Rm, Kansas Union       

A box lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Linda Dixon, ldixon@ku.edu.

 

CSL is pleased to announce our first workshop specifically for the professional development of graduate teaching assistants. This workshop will be an introduction to the service learning pedagogy and an entry point to consider course redesign, developing community partnerships, and incorporating critical reflection assignments.  

Based on demand, our intention is offer a series of workshops that will be a deeper dive into the various aspects of service learning.

If you are unable to make this session, but would like to be notified about future opportunities, contact Linda Dixon at ldixon@ku.edu.

Community Engagement and International Education

Community Engagement and International Education: Advancing Global Learning
with Dr. Eric Hartman

Assistant Professor of Leadership Studies, Kansas State University
Co-Founder globalsl.org

Study Abroad Series


3:00 pm  - 5:00 pm   |    Tuesday, April 12, 2016   |    Jayhawk Rm, Kansas Union       

 

 

This workshop will be led by Dr. Hartman, Assistant Professor in the Staley School of Leadership Studies at Kansas State University and Editor of globalsl.org, a site which amasses evidence-based tools and peer-reviewed research to advance best practices in global learning, cooperative development, and community-university partnership.

Dr. Hartman will demonstrate how intercultural and civic learning goals can be systematically advanced through experiential learning. He will clarify how experiential education can be mis-educative (sometimes re-affirming stereotypes), and provide tips for ensuring sufficient challenge and support to help students grow in intercultural and civic learning, whether through accredited or co-curricular programs.

 This presentation is appropriate for faculty and staff interested in further leveraging the "aha" moments of applied learning into specific, targeted outcomes.

 

Instructional Coaching

Using Instructional Coaching for Service Learning
with Professor Jim Knight

Director of the Kansas Coaching Project
Research Associate, KU Center for Research on Learning

 


4:00 pm  - 5:00 pm   |     Tuesday, April 5, 2016    |     Pine Room, Kansas Union       

 

Dr. Knight is a research associate in the KU Center for Research on Learning and Director of the Kansas Coaching Project. His pioneering work on instructional coaching has received wide attention from both scholarly and practitioner audiences. His contributions have been honored via awards for innovation, service, and also university teaching.

This workshop will provide participants with an introduction to instructional coaching and the opportunity to consider how this approach may be applied to service learning projects. 

In preparation for the session, participants are asked to review the following two articles:

prodev.aeapdonline.org…

www.newyorker.com…

Digital Storytelling
Kristin Norris

This session explained digital storytelling, a pedagogical strategy that uses innovative techniques to facilitate the reflection process and promote learning. When students create a digital story, they engage in a reflection process that allows them to demonstrate their learning through words, visuals, and sound. Participants explored the implications of this pedagogical strategy for teaching and learning and how to integrate digital storytelling into courses or programs. 

 

Goals of the workshop:

  • Understand what digital storytelling is and the benefits for students, faculty, and programs.
  • Understand how the process of creating a digital storytelling leads to deeper learning.
  • Understand how digital storytelling is a strategy that fosters student development (e.g., civic professionalism, life-long learning, sense of identity).
  • Learn how to use digital storytelling to assess course or program outcomes and employ effective strategies for assessing digital stories.

Video of the Workshop

Resources from the Workshop:


Kristin Norris, Assessment Director for the Center for Service & Learning at IUPUI, is responsible for assessing outcomes related to both curricular and co-curricular community engagement. Her research interests are related to student development of civic-mindedness, and civic mentoring relationships. In addition, she has developed a reputation on the use of technology to reinvent reflection and as evidence of student civic learning.

Assessment of Student Learning in Curricular-Based Community Engagement
Julie Hatcher & Kristin Norris

As educators, we have an opportunity to be more intentional by identifying core outcomes related to civic learning. And in order to be successful we need to be attentive to the knowledge, skills, and dispositions we intend for students in our courses to develop. The goal of this session was to consider how activities within the course are structured in order to promote the learning we are after and to examine the multiple ways we can examine civic learning across a range of experiences and stages of development.

 

Session participants were encouraged to consider the following:

  • What do I want to know (e.g., are my students developing the ability to examine the root causes of [insert social issue]?)
  • What type of information will tell me what I want to know? (e.g., written reflections, digital stories, demonstrating their ability to synthesize information)
  • How do I get the information I need to assess student learning? (e.g., scaffold reflections, meta-level reflections)
  • What specific indicators of what I want to know will I examine? (e.g., their ability to name a variety of factors, their demonstration
  • What standards or criteria will I apply to examine the indicators? (e.g., rubric with levels of knowledge related to social issues)

Goals of the workshop:

  • Attendees will articulate student learning outcomes for community-engaged learning.
  • Attendees will bring tools that they currently use to assess targeted learning outcomes in curricular-based community engagement and learn about additional resource to support assessment.
  • Attendees will articulate civic learning outcomes and identify strategies to gather evidence of student learning in this domain.

Video of the Workshop

Powerpoint from the workshop


Julie Hatcher, Executive Director for the Center for Service & Learning at IUPUI, served as the initial Director of Undergraduate Programs in the School of Philanthropy, the first degree program of its kind in the nation. Her research and scholarship focuses on civic learning outcomes in higher education, philanthropic motivations of professionals, the philosophy of John Dewey, and the role of higher education in civil society. She collaborates on national projects such as the Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement and the Association of American Colleges and Universities rubric development team for Civic Engagement.

Kristin Norris, Assessment Director for the Center for Service & Learning at IUPUI, is responsible for assessing outcomes related to both curricular and co-curricular community engagement. Her research interests are related to student development of civic-mindedness, and civic mentoring relationships. In addition, she has developed a reputation on the use of technology to reinvent reflection and as evidence of student civic learning.


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